You are here

Modern Hebrew FAQs

  1. Can I get funding for studying Modern Hebrew?

Yes! For more information on the UW Modern Hebrew program, including course offerings and funding opportunities can be found at https://nelc.washington.edu/scholarships-funding or https://jewishstudies.washington.edu/modern-hebrew-uw/courses-modern-hebrew-language-culture/ and on Professor Naomi Sokoloff's blog at https://jewishstudies.washington.edu/category/sokoloff-blog/

  1. What class should I enroll in?

Students who wish to enroll in a Modern Hebrew language class and are not sure what level is most appropriate should contact Dr. Hadar Khazzam-Horovitz at hadarkh@uw.edu. The 15 credit elementary sequence (MODHEB 101,102,103) is offered once annually, beginning in Autumn Quarter. An intensive version of this same course, also earning 15 credits, may be offered Summer Quarter (MODHEB 105). For information on enrolling for the summer, consult the following website: http://www.summer.washington.edu/summer/enroll/.

The 15 credit intermediate Modern Hebrew course (MODHEB 201, 202, 203) is offered once annually, beginning in Autumn Quarter. To enroll in the intermediate course, students must pass HEBR 103, demonstrate equivalent knowledge, or have the permission of Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz.

Students who are native speakers of Hebrew cannot enroll in MODHEB 101, 102, 103; MODHEB 105; or MODHEB 201, 202, 203. Students who wish to study Modern Hebrew and who are not sure if UW considers them “native speakers” should consult with the admissions office and/or with Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz. Students who speak Hebrew at home but have never studied the language in a formal setting are often considered “near-native speakers.” For placement questions, they should consult with Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz. They are usually placed in HEBR 201 or above.

Modern Hebrew classes are available to non-matriculated students and to Access students on a space-available basis, with permission of Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz. Register through UW Extension.

  1. What’s the curriculum?

The current curriculum for first year Modern Hebrew (and for the summer intensive course) is based on the textbook Shalom: A Comprehensive Course in Modern Hebrew (volumes 1 and 2) by Orly Shoer and Shalom Shoer. The current curriculum for second year Modern Hebrew is based on the textbook Shalom: A Comprehensive Course in Modern Hebrew (volumes 3 and 4).

  1. How can I meet the UW foreign language requirements?

For information on the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, visit the UW website for foreign language requirements at: http://www.washington.edu/uaa/advising/academic-planning/general-educati....

Students who are not enrolled in Modern Hebrew classes, but who wish to demonstrate knowledge sufficient to meet the undergraduate foreign language requirement, may take a Proficiency Exam. In order to schedule an exam, contact Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz. The test covers material from all three quarters of Elementary Modern Hebrew (MODHEB 101,102, 103), and students must pass this test with a score of 75 or higher.

A separate exam covers material from all three quarters of Intermediate Modern Hebrew (MODHEB 201, 202, 203). By receiving a passing mark (a score of 75 or higher) on this exam, students meet the NELC requirements for majors in Near Eastern Studies - Comparative Civilizations and/or the requirements in the JSIS Jewish Studies major for 2 years of Hebrew language study. To schedule an exam, contact Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz

Graduate students taking Modern Hebrew language classes must receive a minimum final grade of 2.7 in order to earn credit toward their degrees.

  1. Can I get credit by exam?

No. NELC no longer offers this option.    

  1. If I want to be admitted to UW and want to show that my knowledge of Hebrew fulfills the foreign language requirement for admission, what do I do?

Individuals applying for admission to undergraduate programs at the University of Washington are required to have completed 2 years of high school foreign language classes. Those who have not met this requirement (and so have a “deficiency” in their application), may take what is called a Deficiency Exam to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of Modern Hebrew. The exam covers material from the first two quarters of Elementary Modern Hebrew (MODHEB 101,102). Students must pass this test with a score of 75 or higher. In order to schedule an exam, contact Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz.

  1. Can I transfer credits in Modern Hebrew?

Yes. Students who wish to transfer credits in Modern Hebrew language courses from Israeli institutions should contact the Office of International Programs and Exchanges. That office can provide information on the proper procedures to follow. Credits will usually transfer as MODHEB 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203 or 490. In cases where students need faculty approval, contact Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz. Students should provide a transcript plus information about the textbooks or curriculum they have studied and the number of in-class hours they spent in their overseas courses. Students who wish to transfer credits from Modern Hebrew language courses at North American institutions should contact Dr. Khazzam-Horovitz.

The first year of Modern Hebrew at the University of Washington is roughly equivalent to Level Aleph at Hebrew University Ulpan; the second year is roughly equivalent to Level Bet.

8. Do Modern Hebrew courses count as VLPA?

Yes! Courses numbered MODHEB 201 and above count as VLPA. First year Modern Hebrew counts as VLPA for students who complete MODHEB 103 or the summer intensive.

Share